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Db2 v PostgreSQL - Mark Gillis

By Mark Gillis 

Mark Gillis has been doing some migration work; porting a Db2 database to a PostgreSQL one. You could say that is going from an Enterprise strength solution to a simpler, but less expensive option, but it’s not a choice Mark is in a position to ignore.

Customers are being presented with a wealth of database options as they migrate to the Cloud, and many of them are embracing the options of simpler and less licence hungry products.

There are many positives to PostgreSQL but there are some pitfalls in attempting such a migration.

Find out more from Mark in Db2 v PostgreSQL

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By Mark Gillis

In his new blog, Mark Gillis explores how to modify queries on the fly using Jupyter Notebook, widgets and interactive SQL.  

 

OK, fair enough, that does sound a bit specialised and will maybe put some people off. Nothing like a good blast of technobabble to send us scurrying to the coffee machine.

What this is getting at is the ability to modify queries on the fly. It’s one of the reasons I’m quite taken with Jupyter Notebooks; the ability to provide some SQL and to run it, take a look at the result set and then tweak the original SQL and re-run it until you get the output you want.

Read the blog, Jupyter Notebooks, Widgets and Interactive SQL in full. 

 

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Tablespaces: where exactly is my data?

By Mark Gillis

This should be pretty straight-forward: you can look in the TABLES System Catalogue and find references for the data (TBSPACE), Indexes (INDEX_TBSPACE) and Large Objects (LONG_TBSPACE). But DB2 throws a few curved balls here; partitioned tables (where the data, indexes and LOBs can be in multiple tablespaces), particular types of index that don’t seem to be in the catalogues at first glance, etc. Let’s see if we can put something together that shows the complete picture.

 

Overview

I’ve got a little database with all sorts of weird and wacky objects. It’s tiny, in terms of volume, but includes row and column-organized tables, range-partitioned tables, MQTs and a bunch of other stuff. Some tables have the full “INDEX IN … LONG IN ….” Tablespace definitions but don’t actually use them, some don’t have any or all the tablespace directives. I want to be able to see the full picture, so how do I go about that?

Click here to find out. 

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